Keeping It Simple

After the recent completion of a beautiful front garden in Newbury, I thought I would highlight how a design – particularly for a front garden – does not have to be complicated to give the ‘wow factor’ to your space.

The brief for this design was to create a visually beautiful entrance to the driveway and home in an area that was originally just lawn. Our client wanted a front garden that would be in keeping with the style of the property and most importantly, one that was simple in its design. I took a traditional, formal styled approached to this design, with clean lines, repeat planting and prominent focal features to give this design the biggest impact.

Before & After

How it works

There were several hard landscaping points that tied the space together. Firstly, a central square area of lawn, with a simple gravel path with metal edging running around the outside, to give definition. A small paved area for a bench at the back of the lawn draws the eye through the space. Material was kept minimal with grey gravel, granite edge details and granite paving to match with the rest of the existing front garden and driveway.

However, the most important aspect for the effective execution of this design was the planting. This was traditional in layout with a contemporary twist and is a good example of the use of repetition and how minimal variety can give a big impact. To define the entrance to the space a large Cupressus ‘Gold crest’ cloud topiary was used. This is eye catching without blocking light or access and with regular clipping will be easy to maintain.

Two narrow beds along the driveway are a repetition of box balls, Allium ‘Purple sensation’ and English Lavender which will give a magnificent stream of purple as you pull into the driveway in the coming months. This is also reflected along the narrow boundary border running the length of the drive using Holly lollipop topiary, box balls and Alliums.

Trees are also used as punctuation marks and again to give formal repetition. These include four fruit trees, adding spring and autumn colour, with lower level planting being mix of Yew balls, grasses and purple perennials. A Japanese Acer in the shadiest corner will also give Autumn colour and be a visual highlight when pulling in and out of the drive.

As you can see from the photos, a design – and particularly a planting design – does not need to be complicated to create impact. Simple designs can be applied to any sized space and in my opinion are the perfect way to give your front garden some kerb appeal with minimal effort.

Leave a Reply

Your personal information will be processed & stored in line with our Privacy Information Policy. Please do not enter personal information into the comment field.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *